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2014 California Academy of Sciences Residency

2014 California Academy of Sciences Residency

One Truth, Many Lies: A New View of Art & Natural History Collections, a new Artist Residency Program at the California Academy of Sciences is seeking applications from West Coast visual artists for 2-3 day residencies in the spring/summer of 2014.

Deadline to apply: December 13, 2013

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Call for Presenters: 2014 Comics and Medicine Conference

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Art as Applied to Medicine in collaboration with Graphic Medicine invites papers for the fifth Comics & Medicine conference, a gathering of healthcare professionals, artists, academic scholars, comics enthusiasts, students, and various stakeholder groups. The conference will take place on June 26-28. Stay tuned for information by subscribing to the site at the link on the top right of the homepage. Additional information on the conference is available on the conference home page.

The theme of this year’s conference, From Private Lives to Public Health, aims to highlight the relationship between comics, personal health narratives, and public health issues such as barriers to healthcare and the stigma of illness. We invite the submission of a wide variety of abstracts focusing on medicine and comics in any form (e.g. graphic novels, comic strips, manga, webcomics) including:

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Call for Exhibits: Creature Design Contest

Creature artist Terryl Whitlatch, well known for her work on Star Wars movies, presented a keynote and workshop at last year's GNSI meeting. She has her own production company now and she is holding a creature drawing contest that some of you might be interested in.

Creature Design Contest

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Call for Exhibits: Wings and Water

Wings & Water: A Juried Exhibition of 2D and 3D Art is a national exhibition exploring artists' perceptions and imagery that comes to mind with the words wings and water, be the imagery botanicals, birds, insects, fish, animals, water/shore environment…open for interpretation. The exhibition is offered though River Arts Inc., a non-profit organization based in Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin dedicated to enriching, inspiring, and educating through the arts. All artists, styles, techniques, and media are welcomed. Please see the details through Café (Callforentry.org). January 1 deadline for March 7-May 6, 2014 show.

Full details and link to entry forms

Developing A Portable Studio

If you attended the past two conferences and stopped by the Technique Showcase, you were treated to a display of field kits presented by a number of our members. It was obvious that the choice of equipment and supplies is as varied as the artists who use them, and depends on their preferred way of working, locale, subjects, etc. And of course, different circumstances may require different kit compositions. All agree, though, that the best way to choose and use your own field kit is to just get out there and try various items out. Keep sketching! We will feature more field kits in future issues.

Laurel Mundy’s Field Kit

I almost always use the same small set of tools, regardless of whether I am working in the field or sketching at home. My most important of those is my blue lead mechanical pencil (along with extra lead), which I use for making all of my preliminary drawings. It is easily erased and hides well under ink and watercolor, which are the two media I most commonly work in while field sketching. I like to bring two erasers; a gum eraser to lighten outlines I don’t I want showing, and a fine eraser with a plastic holder. I usually sketch over my preliminary with a more final version in a regular graphite pencil before moving to the color or ink stage. I also bring along a black and a white color pencil, both very soft, for adding shadows or highlights (along with a quality pencil sharpener, of course). For finalizing dark outlines I usually use a 01 size Pigma Micron, occasionally using the even smaller 005. I like having a Koh-I-Noor rapidograph pen as well if I plan on using a lot of ink in the drawing, as it flows better and is a darker black.

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2013 GNSI Educational Series Workshop: review

GNSI Ed Series Workshop 2013It was a rare treat to spend four days with botanical artist Carol Woodin during the 2013 Education Workshop, “Painting Slipper Orchids in Watercolor” May 31st - June 3rd at the beautiful Reiman Gardens in Ames, Iowa. Carol is a wonderful botanical artist whose breathtakingly beautiful artwork has been exhibited and collected around the world. She has exhibited at the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew and the Smithsonian in Washington, DC, and has her artwork in the Shirley Sherwood collection.

We had class participants come from Minnesota, Illinois, Michigan, Kansas, Iowa, Colorado, and Vancouver, British Columbia. One participant, Matthew Constant, is a very talented high school student who is looking into scientific illustra­tion as a possible career. This was Matthew’s first time working with vellum and his first time seriously working with watercolor paint. He has a lot of potentials.

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Geoff Thompson's Award Winning Fly Photo

Geoff Thompson's photo of flesh flyAustralian GNSI member Geoff Thompson's specimen photos are winning him recognition down under. Geoff works for the Queensland Museum & Science Centre. He was recently honored with several Australian Institute of Medical and Biological Images Awards, including Best Overall Biological Photo for this image. It's the definitive specimen, holotype (QMT2351), of a flesh fly Sarcophaga alpha. The species was described by Johnston and Tiegs in 1922. For the photographers among you, the equipment used: Visionary Digital image, Canon 5D MkII, focus stacked with Zerene.

GNSI-Oregon: Digital Illustration Workshop

August 2 and 3rd, 2013 the GNSI Oregon Group hosted a computer workshop geared toward Scientific Illustrators as part of our ongoing Ocean Art Challenge. Our members had indicated improving basic computer skills was high on their wish list.

Amadeo Bachar, the digital media instructorAmadeo Bachar, the digital media instructor for the Scientific Illustration Program at California State University in Monterey, provided an excellent workshop plan for us, and was an excellent and very qualified teacher, and very patient.

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Science Illustration Sourcebooks

For those who promote their work to potential clients, one of the traditional methods is through sourcebooks. For the science illustration community, this often means September is a big month when the fruits of your labor are put on display in the latest editions of the Science-Art and Medical Illustration Source directories. The Science-Art.com sourcebook is full of GNSI member's work and the art of Nicolle Rager Fuller graces the cover.

Both these publications will be released to a total of 9500 potential art buyers this September. The cool thing about the internet is that the books are already available digitally for your enjoyment, and is an educational opportunity in how others design promotional material for themselves.

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Book Review: The Big Apples of New York

The Big Apples of N.Y. CoverThe Big Apples of New York takes the reader on a wonderful journey that includes apples. It teases the senses. It is filled with rich history related to the apple, from the beginning with Adam and Eve to the people who brought the seeds to America. The book contains myths, medical uses, history, and a wonderful mystery.

The Big Apples of New York is a great addition to the library of a hobbyist, gardener, history buff, botanical artist or any person who loves apples. Even the domestic chef would be surprised by the recipes at the end of the book. The book is filled with beautiful botanical apple plates that visually distinguish the varieties through color and textural look. Descriptions of history and how the portrayed apple might be used are written on the back of the plates. At the back of the book, you will find a list of apple orchards in the state of New York. I found the book easy to read- and thoroughly enjoyable. Just make sure you have apples on hand for a snack.

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[Compiled] 2013 GNSI Annual Conference

2013 GNSI Conference Logo by Dick Rauh

2013 GNSI CONFERENCE

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Call for Exhibits: Plants, Birds & Pollinators-Art Serving Science

The Denver Botanic Gardens and the GNSI are pleased to announce a premier juried exhibition opportunity for GNSI members only, highlighting the subject matter of plants, birds, and pollinators. Subjects may include plants only or animals only (birds, mammals, insects, reptiles & amphibians, etc), but judging weight will be given to images that emphasize plants and their relationships with their pollinators.

Original art only (includes prints of digital works) in 2- or 3-dimensions. Jurying emphasis will be on both artistic excellence and scientific accuracy.

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Sydney Prentice (1873-1943): The Art of Drawing Fossil Whale Bones

 

Parietobalaena palmeri Kellogg (USNM 10677) dorsal view (with detail). Published in Kellogg, 1968. Original drawing: 70 cm (h) x 36 cm (w); published drawing: 19 cm (h) x 8 cm (w).

Abstract

Sydney Prentice (1873-1943) was a paleontological illustrator and a master of the pen and ink thick/thin (eyelash) technique. A collection of his rough sketches, finished art, drawing equipment, zinc engraved printing blocks, and published drawings in the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution document a historic scientific illustration process and serve as an instructional model for artists working today. The drawings were prepared for Smithsonian cetologist Remington Kellogg (1892-1969). A gallery of images may be seen at paleobiology.si.edu/paleoArt/prentice/prentice.html


The Department of Paleobiology in Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) houses several beautiful collections of historical scientific illustrations representing a wide variety of paleontological subject matter. One of these, the Kellogg Illustration Collection, focuses primarily on fossil whale skeletal anatomy and comprises more than 250 pen and ink line drawings and rough sketches of over sixty species of whales (Fig. 1). Sydney Prentice, a master of the pen and ink line technique, prepared most of the drawings. They appear mainly in publications by the Smithsonian cetologist, Remington Kellogg.

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2013 GNSI Presidential Election

Amelia JanesAll members in good standing are eligible to vote on the next President of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. The newly-elected President of the GNSI will serve as President-Elect for one year, President for two years, and Immediate Past President for one year. The nominee for this position is Amelia Janes.

To vote please go to http://www.gnsi.org/forum/business/gnsi-presidents-election-link
(You must be a logged in GNSI member in good standing to see this page. For login instructions go to this FAQ: http://www.gnsi.org/forum/faqs/check-membership-expiration-date)

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Call for Exhibits: The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize

Entries are open to the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize, a unique opportunity for talented artists to immerse themselves in the wonders of science.

Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize

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2013 Illustrating Nature Exhibit

The Science Illustration Graduate Certificate Program at California State University, Monterey Bay is proud to announce the 24th Annual Illustrating Nature Exhibit. This renowned show will be held for its 4th year at the Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History. The opening reception is May 3rd from 5-7 p.m. and the show will run through June 16.

This year's 2013 Science Illustration students hail from six countries and have diverse backgrounds in both the sciences and the arts. They have come together with one commonality: a love for the art of nature. Within this broad genre, you will find a variety of subjects. If you love science, nature, and art there is sure to be something you will find captivating, and the caliber of artistry is truly astounding.

Only 15 students are selected for this prestigious graduate certificate program every year ensuring an outstanding level of artistic talent and scientific know how. The major focal point is natural history and students are encouraged to explore any and all scientific subjects of their choosing for which they have an interest. From the four instructors Ann Caudle, Jenny Keller, Amadeo Bachar, and Logan Parsons, the students are taught traditional science illustration techniques, digital media, layout and design, and how to prepare oneself for the professional world at large. Many excellent and intriguing guest speakers throughout the school year provide encouragement and examples on a variety of career paths a science illustrator may choose, including: publishing in textbooks, children's books, science journals, and popular magazines; forensic reconstruction; extinct or prehistoric species reconstruction; fine art exhibiting, illustrating for scientific research; creature design for the entertainment industry; and on the business side: the laws of how to be an artist, and how to protect and conduct oneself legally and professionally.

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Book Release: Why Would Anyone Cut a Tree Down?

Why Would Any One Cut a Tree Down, Cover

The US Forest Service just released a beautifully-illustrated, non-fiction children’s picture book that discusses why trees are sometimes cut down.

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Pat Latas wins Artists for Conservation fellowship

On April 18, 2013, Artists for Conservation (AFC) announced its 14th fellowship, a grant in the amount of $5,000 US, awarded to American wildlife artist Patricia Latas of Tucson, Arizona. The fellowship is part of the AFC Flag Expeditions Program, which supports up to two artists per year in their fieldwork, studying and rendering endangered species or habitats that deserve greater public attention, particularly in remote parts of the world.

The primary goal of the expedition is to illustrate and support the efforts of the Kakapo Recovery Team - a conservation organization whose mission it is to save the Kakapo- a flightless species of parrot that lives in burrows in New Zealand.

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Call For Exhibits: HIV Visualization Challenge

Former GNSI member Graham Johnson writes:

In my lab at UCSF and my former lab at Scripps, we have developed two software packages that enable easy access to molecular modeling and to large 3D models of cells with molecular details.  To kick off the open-source release of the latter project, I designed a visualization challenge.  Unfortunately, it is in its last days, but there is a brand new category using quick and simple animation tools in molecular viewers like Chimera and PMV with no competitors yet as well as a category for still images that give people with nothing better to do this weekend a chance to compete.  Would it be possible to post this announcement (or some simpler link in your own words) for the contest on the GNSI forum?  No worries if you think its too late.  I'm happy to send any images you need or you can find them on my website for the contest http://www.autopack.org/cellpackchallenge2012.
Thank you,
Graham

cellPACK Visualization Challenge2012

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The COM.EN.ART Experience

Abstract

Huyck preserveCOMmunity . ENvironment . ART (COM.EN.ART) is an artist-in-residency program for natural history artists. Each year five to seven professional or aspiring natural history artists are selected to spend one to two weeks at the Huyck Preserve biological field station and nature preserve. Artists are free to produce artwork in their chosen manner and medium. The institution provides housing and studio space. In exchange, the artist is asked to contribute an original work constituting something appropriate for exhibition and publication. Here is my experience…

Years ago in western Kansas, there was a sign on Interstate 70 that read Next McDonald’s 100 Miles and when passing it I would say to the kids, “We are really in the wilderness.” Of course, creeping commercialization has long since removed the need for that sign, but when the announcement for COM.EN.ART arrived, I went online to check out the Huyck Preserve and discovered that this place really was the wilderness. Now I have never been much of a traveler or thrill seeker preferring instead to let Rick Steves and Rudy Maxa do all the hard work while I just sit back and vicariously tour the world. But the kids are grown and Medicare (if it still exists) looms on the horizon. It seemed like the perfect time to experience living on the edge. Besides, I would only have to give up my urban comforts for two weeks. So I put together the required materials and sent in an application.

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