Fernando Correia's Work Featured in National Geographic-Portugal Edition

Fernando Correia reconstruction for National Geographic Portugal EditionTwo Portuguese paleontologists - Rui Araujo and Ricardo Castanhinha - whose work was partially supported by a National Geographic Society grant, have excavated in Mozambique searching for Permian fossils since 2009. Their findings wrote a new page in the earth history book and have allowed a better understanding of mammalian ancestors' evolution journey. Portuguese Editor, Gonçalo Pereira, once again challenged illustrator Fernando Correia to recreate a paleontological scene, this one regarding the Permian period, and based on the available fossil records. Following a traditional workflow, the researchers, the illustrator, and Art Director Vasco Martins worked closely together in order to achieve the best visual approach and, simultaneously, the necessary credibility and scientific accuracy.

The main directive and emphatic vectors were: a slightly hilly horizon, a lake (similar to present-day Niassa Lake), and a typical Permian phyto community in the background; in the foreground, three animals already identified and described (left, a Gorgonopsian; middle, a Temnospondyl; right, a Dicynodon), near a shallow stream. The result was a double page illustration that opens the article published in this February's issue of National Geographic - Portugal.

Fernando Correia was the first Portuguese scientific illustrator invited to publish in the Portuguese edition of NG magazine (in the very first issue, April 2001, with a sauropod illustration) and has won awards for some of the illustrations he often creates for this magazine: the Stuart National Illustration Award (in 2005) and, last year, the Best Edit award (covering the 30 international NG March 2012 editions) for illustrating a Portuguese plesiosaur finding.

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